• ‘‘
    This is a remarkably absorbing account of an India in transition – full of challenges and contradictions, but also of expectations, hope, and ultimately optimism.”
    — Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate
  • ‘‘
    There are many virtues of Akash Kapur’s beautifully sketched portrait of modern India. The book reads like a novel. Kapur’s skill is to get people talking and to weave their stories into a necessarily messy debate about India’s future.”
    The Financial Times
  • ‘‘
    Impressively lucid and searching... In his clarity, sympathy and impeccably sculpted prose, Kapur often summons the spirit of V. S. Naipaul.”
    — Pico Iyer, Time magazine
  • ‘‘
    A wonderful writer: a courageously clear-eyed
    observer, an astute listener, a masterful portraitist, and a gripping storyteller.”
    — Philip Gourevitch,
         author of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We
         Will Be Killed With Our Families
  • ‘‘
    [R]eadable, acutely observed, and crammed with well-drawn characters.... Mr. Kapur offers a corrective to a simplistic 'new, happy narrative' of a rising India. That is welcome and he does it well.”
    The Economist
  • ‘‘
    Marvelous... Sharp-eyed, insightful, skillfully-sketched and
    beautifully written, India Becoming is the
    remarkable debut of a distinctive new talent.”
    — William Dalrymple, author of Nine Lives
  • ‘‘
    Akash Kapur lives in and writes out of an India that few writers venture into. His writing has established him as one of the most reliable observers of the New India.”
    — Pankaj Mishra, author of Temptations of the West
  • ‘‘
    Lucid, balanced. Kapur is determinedly fair-minded, neither an apologist nor a scold, and he is a wonderfully empathetic listener.”
    The New York Times Book Review
  • ‘‘
    Through a series of deft character sketches, Akash Kapur captures the contradictions of life in modern India...His writing is fresh and vivid; his perspective, empathetic and appealingly non-judgemental.”
    — Ramachandra Guha,
         author of India after Gandhi
  • ‘‘
    A fascinating look at the transformation of India, with broader lessons on the upside and downside of progress.”
    Booklist (starred review)

Beyond the Digital Divide

An article on new business models that seek to bridge the digital divide with for-profit solutions. Published in The Economist

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The Present Is a Foreign Country

Review of Heaven’s Edge, by Romesh Gunesekera, The New York Times Book Review

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House of Blue Mangoes

Review of The House of Blue Mangoes, by David Davidar, The New York Times Book Review

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The Picador Book of Modern Indian Writing

Review of The Picador Book of Modern Indian Writing, edited by Amit Chaudhuri, The New Statesman
Anyone turning to this anthology in search of a tradition is likely to be rather bewildered by the bedlam of languages, themes and genres. But perhaps there is method in this madness. So many of the pieces in this collection suffer the same absence of a tradition that, at some point, it seems churlish to insist on calling it an absence.

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Politics Into Economics Don’t Go

An essay on the literature of immigrants, published in Index on Censorship
The end of the Cold War altered political realities; it also changed the way the West receives–and reads–immigrants

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Techno-Brahmins

Review of India Unbound, by Gurcharan Das, The New York Times Book Review

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To Hell in His Handbasket

Review of Eastward to Tartary, by Robert Kaplan, published in The Nation
Given his penchant for grand narratives, it’s a little strange that Kaplan misses the larger picture, the broad canvas upon which the events he describes are unfolding. But that’s the danger of serving history too faithfully.

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Subcontinental Divide

Review of The Other Side of Silence, by Urvashi Butalia, The New York Times Book Review

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Wages of Sin

Review of An Obedient Father, by Akhil Sharma, The New York Times Book Review

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Inside the Jihad

An interview with Ahmed Rashid, published in Atlantic Unbound

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